Arabic Newswire English Translation Collection

Item Name: Arabic Newswire English Translation Collection
Author(s): Xiaoyi Ma, Dalal Zakhary
LDC Catalog No.: LDC2009T22
ISBN: 1-58563-521-9
ISLRN: 677-375-027-082-6
Release Date: August 18, 2009
Member Year(s): 2009
DCMI Type(s): Text
Data Source(s): newswire
Application(s): syntactic parsing, natural language processing
Language(s): English, Standard Arabic, Arabic
Language ID(s): eng, arb, ara
License(s): LDC User Agreement for Non-Members
Online Documentation: LDC2009T22 Documents
Licensing Instructions: Subscription & Standard Members, and Non-Members
Citation: Ma, Xiaoyi, and Dalal Zakhary. Arabic Newswire English Translation Collection LDC2009T22. Web Download. Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, 2009.

Introduction

The Arabic English Newswire Translation Collection was produced by the Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC). It consists of approximately 550,000 words of Arabic newswire text and its English translation from Agence France Presse (France), An Nahar (Lebanon) and Assabah (Tunisia). The source Arabic text was used in LDC's Arabic Treebank, specifically, in Part 1 (Part 1 v. 2.0; Part 1 v. 3.0), Part 3 (Part 3 v. 1.0; Part 3 v. 2.0) and Part 4 (Part 4 v. 1.0). A subset of Agence France Presse (AFP) source text from Arabic Treebank: Part 1 v. 2.0 was previously translated and released by LDC in Arabic Treebank: Part 1 - 10K-word English Translation, LDC2003T07. The English translations in this corpus were provided by translation agencies using LDC's Arabic Translation Guidelines.

Data

The number of stories and their epochs for each source are as follows:

AFP 734 stories; July 2000 - November 2000
An Nahar 600 stories; January 2002 - December 2002
Assabah 397 stories; September 2004 - November 2004
Total 1731 stories

Word count of Arabic tokens by source is shown in the following table:

AFP 102,564
An Nahar 299,681
Assabah 149,259
Total 551,504

The original source files used different encodings for the Arabic characters, including UTF8 and ASMO. SGML tags were used for marking sentence and paragraph boundaries and for annotating other information about each story. All Arabic source data was converted to UTF and most SGML tags were removed or replaced by "plain text" markers.

Samples

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